LDN - Back to homepage
GDPR - Privacy Notice
 
HyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLinkHyperLink
Who is the “Civil Society” that is preparing to run for Parliamentary Elections?

The term “civil society” has been used to describe those who are “active” outside the traditional societal organizations and within oppositional movements against other parts of society, mainly against state authorities.

Frequent calls have been recently made to unite the forces of “civil society” under one front to compete in the much anticipated parliamentary elections. More often than not, we hear about a meeting for “civil society organizations”, an intervention by a “civil society activist”, or a movement by “representatives of civil society”. Who is this civil society? Who does it represent? Who assigned its members to speak in our name? How do we join it or rise to become one of its “actors”?

Some say that civil society consists of  all bodies and individuals outside state institutions. Great, but does that include companies of the private sector, and parties, who are also outside the public sector? We do not know. Does it include trade unions, student clubs, and occupational, crafts and sports unions? We do not know. Hence, who does it represent?

Indeed, the term “civil society” has been used to describe those who are “active” outside the traditional societal organizations and within oppositional movements against other parts of society, mainly against state authorities. Those who regularly follow up with activities of “civil society” organizations, on the one hand, would notice their ability to motivate and engage a significant number of citizens in campaigns revolving around local demands, such as the movement protesting the waste crisis, and on the other hand, its struggle to deal with core organizational issues, such as political discourse or internal administration, as well as its alienation from traditional political organizations such as parties and trade unions.

The main crisis in my opinion for all constituencies of “civil society” is that of popular legitimacy. In other words, it is about how much support and influence each group garners from the community. In the age of “scoops” and “social media”, the popularity of individuals and groups has been measured by the number of “likes” and media appearances. There is no longer a need to build an in-depth and distinct political discourse or plan for cumulative political battles. Politics was abandoned for violent speeches against the other and social media became the new platform through which competition for the “followers” and attention... more


 
 
  Partners
E-Campus
Innovety
Jovesolides
Odessa Law Academy
EP
Formetica
CCAB
ADAPT
Giolli Cooperativa
AlHayat Center
Futuro Digitale
Jordan River Foundation
ILO
SDC
SIDC
BMA
Global Fund for Children
MENAHRA
RI
UN Habitat
WBI
IREX
Mediter
CSR in action
About us: Who we are | Board | Consultants | Team | Memberships | Client Base | Testimonials | In The Media
Services: Introduction | Consulting | Training | Planning | Activities: Events | Projects
Workshops | News: Articles | Reports | Insights | Interviews
Gallery | Job Market: CVs | Jobs | F.A.Q. | Links | Guestbook | Directory | Contact



Design and Development by ITEC - Innovative Technology